Ringtone | 2014 | 30 minutes | Miyarrka Media | Australia A beautiful, funny and surprisingly moving film about the connections, intrusions and demands brought by mobile phones to a once remote community in northern Australia. In this collaboratively produced and directed film, Yolngu Aboriginal families offer glimpses into their lives and relationships through their choice of ringtones. From ancestral clan songs to 80s hip hop artists and local gospel tunes, these songs locate individuals in a world of deep and enduring connection. Yet, at the same time, these phones make Yolngu vulnerable to a range of threats, from sorcerers

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In 2008 the introduction of Telstra’s 3G mobile network generated a wave of creative energy across Arnhem Land. New genres of video, photography and performance flourished. Travelling lightning-speed via satellite and Bluetooth, this emerging digital culture rode the energy of the new and the cheeky. Moving hand-to-hand, kin-to-kin, community-to-community, it drew inspiration from both the internet and the ancestral. It was made to be watched, to be shared, and then deleted to make way for the next.So began a new era in Australian Indigenous media.

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Paul Gurrumuruwuy; Fiona Yangathu; Jennifer Deger; David Mackenzie 2012 l 60 mins l Australia The complex sorrows and joys of Christmas in northeast Arnhem Land, one of the largest and most isolated tracts of Aboriginal land in Australia, are imbued with the transformative cycle of life, death, and rebirth. Narrated by Yolngu director Paul Gurrumuruwuy, this film examines how stories first brought by missionaries in the mid-20th century have become the basis for celebrating the enduring place of the ancestral in the modern world. The story is symbolically structured around the graves of three Dhalwangu clan leaders. Building from the

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Paul Gurrumuruwuy; Fiona Yangathu; Jennifer Deger; David Mackenzie 2011 l  Three channel video installation, photographs and sculptural elements l Australia In Australia’s remote northeast Arnhem Land, Christmas is celebrated as a time to remember the dead, a time to evoke ancestral spirits (birrimbirr) and a time to renew and revitalize relationships amongst the living. Under the guidance of Yolngu director, Paul Gurrumuruwuy, Christmas Birrimbirr experiments with re-producing Yolngu Christmas rites in a gallery or museum setting. Drawing on Yolngu aesthetics and social values, the work uses new media technologies to strengthen contemporary Yolngu society while “sharing feelings” across cultures. The

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